Browse & buy our books online

Biography & Autobiography

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 28

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  1. American Evita: Lurleen Wallace, Janice Law
    $19.95

    America Evita: Lurleen Wallace is a book that includes parallel biographies of Lurleen Wallace, female governor of Alabama, and Evita Peron, beloved Argentinean leader.  Author Janice Law offers an insightful look into the similarities of these two women as they rose to political power and dealt with serious emotional and health-related issues. For those who want to know more about Wallace and Peron, American Evita is a must-read.

    Learn More
  2. The Bridal Wreath Bush by Kathryn Tucker Windham
    $14.95

    In this elegant, simple tale of a true incident from her childhood, renowned storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham reminds us of the endurance of love and the durability of the human spirit.

    Hiram, a poor farmer, approaches her father, a banker, for a loan of expense money for a journey.

    The background to Hiram's quest encompasses love, loss, the terrible human costs of slavery, and the complex relationships between black and white Southerners.

    Hiram returns from his journey with a gift for his banker friend: a bridal wreath bush. That bush prompts the telling of this story, with its heartening separation and, many years later, its poignant reunion.

    Learn More
  3. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    $16.00

    In the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Rebecca Skloot introduces us to Henrietta Lacks, the "real-life woman" behind one of the greatest scientific advances ever discovered. Henrietta wasn't a scientist though, she was a black woman who's cervical cancer cells took on a life of their own after being harvested without her consent in 1951. These cells labeled as HeLa cells, became known as "the immortal cells" when they not only lived, but thrived outside of Henrietta's body. To date, more than fifty million metric tons have grown from that  tiny unremarkable initial sampling. Scientists soon discovered that these cells were the perfect catalyst for engineering medication, understanding the nature of cancer, and revealing the aging process. 

    As a teenager in 1988, Rebecca Skloot was given a brief explanation of what HeLa cells were and thankfully, something about these mysterious cells sparked an interest that would turn into this work of non-fiction. It didn't take very long for Skloot to discover that although Henrietta's cells were biological celebrities, Henrietta died relatively unknown and certainly without knowledge of her contribution to science and humanity. Twenty years and innumerable scientific publications pass before Henrietta's family are even made aware of the HeLa cells' extraordinary life. Skloot traces the emotional rollercoaster and the toll it has taken on Henrietta's family. She befriends Deborah, Henrietta's daughter, who points out the paradox between the necessity of the HeLa cells and her struggle to pay for medication that only exists because of them.

    Skloot treads the fine line between haunting biography and narrative scientific report. Her life and the lives of Henrietta's children, cousins, and kin are irrevocably intertwined. Skloot spent thousands of hours researching not only the human side of HeLa cells, but the scientific side, making this read as informative as it is engrossing. It's no small wonder that The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks has sparked the interest in millions of readers world-wide. Skloot's devotion to the business of fact-finding does not bog down the narrative nature of this biography and her no-holds-barred approach to writing makes it an approachable work. 

     

    Learn More
  4. Breakfast at Tiffany's: The Official 50th Anniversary Companion by Sarah Gristwood (Hardcover)
    $29.95

    Holly Golightly was undoubtedly the role that made Audrey Hepburn a movie icon. Dressed by Hubert de Givenchy and accessorised with the trademark cigarette holder, she played her most memorable part in Breakfast at Tiffany's. Adapted from the Truman Capote novella of the same name, and directed by the infamous Blake Edwards, the inspired cast took the screenplay and fashioned it into the touching comedy of a young woman finding her way in the world.

    As the only official companion to be published in association with Paramount Pictures and the Audrey Hepburn Estate, Breakfast at Tiffany's: The Official 50th Anniversary Companion is a gorgeously illustrated tribute to this timeless film. Featuring stunning photographs, behind-the-scenes stories, full-color reproductions of the poster art, and a special section on the costumes, this keepsave volume is the perfect celebration of a beloved classic.

    Learn More
  5. Too Brief a Treat: The Letters of Truman Capote
    $16.00

    The private letters of Truman Capote, lovingly assembled here for the first time by acclaimed Capote biographer Gerald Clarke, provide an intimate, unvarnished portrait of one of the twentieth century's most colorful and fascinating literary figures.

    Capote was an inveterate letter writer. He wrote letters as he spoke: emphatically, spontaneously, and passionately. Spanning more than four decades, his letters are the closest thing we have to a Capote autobiography, showing us the uncannily self-possessed naif who jumped headlong into the post-World War II New York literary scene; the more mature Capote of the 1950s; the Capote of the early 1960s, immersed in the research and writing of In Cold Bloodand Capote later in life, as things seem to be unraveling. With cameos by a veritable who's who of twentieth-century glitterati, Too Brief a Treat shines a spotlight on the life and times of an incomparable American writer.

    Learn More
  6. Capote: A Biography by Gerald Clarke
    $17.95

    The acclaimed biography of the author of In Cold Blood and Breakfast at Tiffany’s is now a major motion picture from United Artists and Sony Pictures Classics starring Philip Seymour Hoffman.

    Based on hundreds of hours of interviews with Capote as well as with nearly everyone who knew him, this absorbing biography follows Truman Capote from his eccentric childhood in Alabama to the heights of New York society. In addition to offering a vivid recreation of the period in Capote’s life that produced In Cold Blood, Capote candidly recounts this gifted writer’s descent into a life of alcohol and drugs that would ultimately consume his enormous talent. But not before he’d hobnobbed with the likes of Babe Paley and Lee Radziwill, feuded with Gore Vidal and Jacqueline Susann, staged his never-to-be-equaled Black and White Ball, and left an impact that is still resonating thirty years later.

    Learn More
  7. The Man Who Planted Trees: The Story of Lost Groves, the Science of Trees, and a Plan to Save the Planet (Paperback) by Jim Robbins
    $16.00

    More than twenty years ago, David Milarch, a northern Michigan nurseryman, had a near-death experience in which he was shown an image of a devastated Earth: Its trees were dying, and without them, he was told, human life was in jeopardy. He was tasked with cloning the champion trees of the world--the strongest, oldest trees--and reintroducing their hardier genetics into our ailing forests as a way to combat climate change. When New York Times journalist Jim Robbins heard about Milarch's work, he was fascinated but had his doubts. Over the next few years, though, talking to scientists and traveling to the redwoods and sequoias with Milarch, Robbins came to realize how much we don't yet understand about trees: how they filter our air and water, how they communicate, why they die, and the myriad crucial ways they support life on Earth. The Man Who Planted Trees is both a gripping investigation into the cutting-edge science of trees and an inspiring lesson in how each of us can make a difference.

    Learn More
  8. The Man Who Planted Trees: The Story of Lost Groves, the Science of Trees, and a Plan to Save the Planet (Hardcover) by Jim Robbins
    $25.00

    More than twenty years ago, David Milarch, a northern Michigan nurseryman, had a near-death experience in which he was shown an image of a devastated Earth: Its trees were dying, and without them, he was told, human life was in jeopardy. He was tasked with cloning the champion trees of the world--the strongest, oldest trees--and reintroducing their hardier genetics into our ailing forests as a way to combat climate change. When New York Times journalist Jim Robbins heard about Milarch's work, he was fascinated but had his doubts. Over the next few years, though, talking to scientists and traveling to the redwoods and sequoias with Milarch, Robbins came to realize how much we don't yet understand about trees: how they filter our air and water, how they communicate, why they die, and the myriad crucial ways they support life on Earth. The Man Who Planted Trees is both a gripping investigation into the cutting-edge science of trees and an inspiring lesson in how each of us can make a difference.

    Learn More
  9. 10-4 Over and Out by Dickie Williams
    $15.95

    These are events that I experienced during the 1940s and 1950s. All are true and most are about hunting and fishing. I loved every moment of this era. I enjoyed all of these moments and will never forget any of them.

    Learn More
  10. The Other Side of Selma by Dickie WIlliams
    $15.95

    R. B. "Dickie" Williams III was born in Mobile, but grew up mostly in Monroeville, Alabama. His summers and holidays were spent with his Granddaddy Williams on the Williams plantation in Finchburg, Alabama, 18 miles west of Tunnel Springs. He graduated from Monroeville High School in 1953, where he lettered four years in football, basketball, and baseball. He enrolled at Auburn then transferred to Howard College (now Samford University), where he graduated with a B.S. in pharmacy. He worked at Edgewood Drug Store in Homewood and Swift Drug Co. in Selma before joining the dixie Division of the National Guard. In 1960, he married Sue Russell from Safford, Alabama. In August 1961, he moved back to Monroeville and opened Williams Drug Store, which he has run since. In his spare time, he organized and created the Monroe County Conservation Club, the Monroe County Museum, and the Monroe County Stating Fishing Lake at Beatrice, Alabama. He has served as president of the National Wildlife Federation for 21 consecutive years. His advice to all: "Press on and don't sweat the little things." Learn More

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-10 of 28

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3